When I cook…

An old post I found in my drafts, then I thought why not. 😀

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Cooking…??? I wouldn’t say cooking is not my forte like those high-society ladies or young college-going girls or boys, who find a pride in boasting,

How do you make tea? I have never ever boiled water, let alone make tea.

“I am born in such a rich family that I have never had a glass of water by myself. We always had a cook or two at home.”

Come one man, stop irritating!!! What’s the big deal in boiling water??? 😡

My 7-year old can carefully chop veggies for salads using a chopper, make Nimbu Pani, make a butter toast in toaster, and you want me to believe a 20+ female or male cannot make tea or boil water?

Nautankis!!! 😡 :-/ 😡

If you really aren’t aware, I really pity you. I am not saying everyone should be a Master Chef, but one should not be so dependent on others that if there’s no one, one has to go hungry even with all necessary ingredients/items available at home. I myself am not a great cook. People might not lick their fingers at my recipes, but I can say for sure that no one will be left hungry. I can definitely manage.

I started cooking at the age of 9. Tea and other small stuffs we learnt much earlier. Thanks to my Ammamma (granny) who told my mother to teach both of us (me and my lil sis) cooking for our own benefit. We were about 5 and 9 then. Mom had just been detected with high blood sugar after falling unconscious at a wedding function. By the age of 11, I could knead dough for chappatis, make decent ghar ka (home-made) food. I must appreciate my mother who made it a point that we learn everything from brooming, mopping, cooking, shopping, everything. She made us truly independent.

When I was in college, I had this wonderful privilege of serving my Dad with hot and fluffy chappatis with garam-garam sabzi. My college was adjacent to my home.  Whenever I had a free hour in between lectures, you would either find me in the Computer Lab at the college or the kitchen in our home. I used to try and make lunch for Amma and my sis, who would return from school in the scorching summer heat and would not have to spend time cooking. They could find everything ready on the dining table. I used to love the way Amma used to compliment me for my sambhar, rasam, upperi and pulao. And to be frank, I was always under the impression that I was very good at what I was doing.

And then I got married. 🙂 🙂 🙂

Life suddenly became a nightmare from a fairy tale. No assumptions please!!! 😀

Married into this totally strange, geographically and culturally different family…and that too out my own choice, unaccepted by the families, at least some members of the family. It was my fight for acceptance. Everything I did was wrong. No, no not because I was wrong, or had to be proved wrong. It was all because of the cultural difference. Like I mentioned in an earlier mail, coconut which at my mother’s place was not supposed to be broken through the eyes, was broken only through the eyes at my in-laws place. Putting a cloth over the head is considered bad at my place, but it is a mark of respect at my in-laws place. And so many things…every time I was about to do something, I was scared that this might be the wrong way here. But thankfully, I was accepted.

It is indeed a feather in the cap when your mother-in-law says,

Khaana achha banati ho. Mera beta bhookha nahi rahega.”

Translation: “You make good food. My son won’t be hungry ever.”

Such a compliment coming from someone, who makes everything so perfectly, so yummy…it’s indeed a BIG thing. 🙂 🙂 🙂

She was more happy to see me cook non-veg dishes, for Mr. Right could not live without non-veg and had married a vegetarian (not 100% though). We used to have non-veg once or twice in a year, when Acha (Dad in Malayalam) used to cook.

Thank you, Maa (mother in Hindi)! 🙂

Now let me rush back into the kitchen for my Dhaba Mutton Curry will get spoiled and the three musketeers will be upset. 😀

Updated to include the following pics…

image

Bhindi Masala courtesy: I Eat coz I Love to Cook (http://m.facebook.com/saricooks)

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9 thoughts on “When I cook…

  1. Aha. Both my sons know how to manage the kitchen thankfully, and their partners too do. So I guess they shall all have no problem filling stomachs, and hearts 🙂
    Mutton for lunch? Sounds good!

    • Wow! Good to know that both your sons cook too. I have a special love for mothers who teach their sons everything and don’t make them feel they are one special species. Kudos to you. 🙂

      Yeah. Mutton was good and the three musketeers relished it well. Job done, hearts won. 😀

  2. Rex…
    I won’t put in any comment for this post but would like to reply to this with another post which just came into my mind. Hope you would get my take on your post. 🙂

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  5. Can’t agree more , loved this post and there is nothing more irritating than meeting people, esp. women, who boast that they know ‘nothing’ about cooking, because they didn’t have to do that..blame their upbringing 😮

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